Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Sharyl's Jewelry New Product Line and Giveaway



Sharyl's Jewelry has a new line of components that she is calling matchsticks. She has made them from sterlling silver and released the first five pair into her Metapolies™ store on Etsy!
You can find the following colors in her store now:


  • Orchid (medium purple shade)
  • Sage green
  • Red
  • Dark Violet (a very dark bluish-purple)
  • 2-toned Blue (navy and medium blue stripes)

 Read her blog to find out more about these really cute components and to enter the giveaway.  I am still trying to figure out what color I like the best.  What color would you choose?

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

American Bombay Cats and Folklore


American Bombay Cat (Creative Commons photo from Wikipedia)


If you follow my blog you know that my 3 pets are Siamese cats .  I have done a previous blog about one of my cats Lucy.  Lucy is my main jewelry assistant who is in charge of quality control.  He loves to lay on my jewelry props when I am photographing. There is sun where I photograph so naturally it is a favorite spot of his. 
Lucy















My daughter acquired my love for the Siamese breed and had 2 Siamese cats who were Lucy's brothers.  Recently, one of the brothers passed away and she got a black rescue kitten. I have learned a lot about black cats since then and I am becoming a huge fan of them.

The Cat Fanciers' Association recognizes 22 cat breeds that can come with solid black coats.The Bombay breed is exclusively black.  Their high melanin pigment content causes most black cats to have yellow  eyes.  My daughter's cat is a Bombay cat.


There is lots of  folklore surrounding black cats.  It varies from culture to culture. Some of the folk lore has positive connotations.  The Scots believe that a strange black cat's arrival to the home signifies prosperity. In Celtic mythology, a fairy known as the Cat Sìth takes the form of a black cat. Black cats are also considered good luck in Japan.  The supernatural powers ascribed to black cats were sometimes viewed positively, for example sailors with a "ship's cat" would want a black one because it would bring good luck.  Sometimes, fishermen's wives would keep black cats at home too, in the hope that they would be able to use their influence to protect their husbands at sea  The view of black cats being favorable creatures is attributed specifically to the Egyptian goddess Bast (or Bastet), the cat goddess. Egyptian households believed they could gain favor from Bastet by hosting black cats in their household. 
 Cat Sìth from John Dickson Batten - More English Fairy Tales, Jacobs, J., New York: G. P. Putnam's sons; London  (public domain)

There are also some negative connotations associated with black cats.   In Western history, black cats have often been looked upon as a symbol of evil omens, specifically being suspected of being the familiars of witches. Lots of Europe considers the black cat a symbol of bad luck, especially if one crosses paths with a person, which is believed to be an omen of misfortune and death.   In Georgia, where my daughter got her rescue black cat, there is a common practice of not allowing black cat adoptions around Halloween time because people will sometimes harm them.  

My daughter with Boo
A new cat practice that my daughter follows is the humane practice of putting tips on her cats nails to prevent him from clawing furniture etc.  This has replaced the declawing of cats.  Of course, she likes to color co-ordinate her nails with Boo's nails.  



video

Boo enjoying the bathtub
Boo is a very active and affectionate kitten.  He loves to follow my daughter around her house.  The bathroom and especially the bathtub/shower is a favorite spot.  He is fascinated with water and loves to look at water run down the shower and tub.  He has been know to play in his water bowl and leave paw prints throughout the house.

Black Cat Ceramic by Moriah Betterly
I have a very large collection of Siamese cat jewelry.  I can see American Bombay cat jewelry in my future.  You might pop into my online shop and see if I have any Boo inspired jewelry there from time to time.  Right now I have a lot of new Spring designs.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

March Giveaway


March Giveaway by silverniknats

Silvernats is celebrating spring by having a giveway!
  • The giveaway includes by silverniknats:
  • Lampwork leaves by Kim Snider of Mandrel Beads
  • Green and blue cermaic focal by Nancy Schindler of Round Rabbit
  • More lampwork leaves and butterly wings by Kim Snider of Mandrel Beads
  • Flower pendent by Elaine Ray (whom I believe no longer makes beads) 
  • Selection of polymer clay beads by Claire Lockwood of Something to do Beads

  • So here's what you have to do....


    Read Silverniknats blog for complete directions to enter.  It is located at http://silverniknats.blogspot.com/2015/03/march-giveaway.html


    I have entered and I am hoping I win but good luck to all!

    Friday, March 20, 2015

    We're All Ears March Challenge Features intriguing Macro Photos of Dragonflies


    macro photo by Martin Amm 
    These macro photos by Martin Amm who is a German nature photographer are the inspiration photos for this month's We're All Ears Challenge

    Close up of dragonfly

    These are  extreme close ups of a dragonfly or damselfly covered in morning dew.  I am really intrigued by the drops of dew that can be seen in this close photography.


     I also found all of the colors in this photograph amazing.  I suspect that to the naked eye, such diverse colors wouldn't be visible.


    Daisy Earrings by BayMoonDesign are available for purchase HERE

    These unique handmade floral earrings with lampwork beads in yellow with a touch of what looks like little flecks of gold are inspired by the yellow and browns in the photograph.  These beads were made by an SRA artist.  The little flecks of gold are tiny like grains of sand.  These flecks remind me of the little drops of dew in the photographs.  I combined them with Czech glass daisy beads because these beads had the same yellows and browns.  I added gold ear wire to compliment the gold flecks in the lampwork. 

    Did you find these macro photos as intriguing as I did?

    Sunday, March 15, 2015

    March ABS Challenge Combines Art with Bears


    The Haida Totems by Emily Carr

    This month's March Art Bead Challenge painting is by Emily Carr a renowned Canadian artist. The Haida Totems are one of her many plein air paintings from her 6 week journey to document totems through British Columbia.  The painting is subdued yet bright capturing the feeling of the totems and their locations.

    Brown Bear Necklace by BayMoonDesign 
    The mountains and woods in this painting reminded me of my trips to the mountains of Yosemite National Park in California and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.  I saw bears in Yellowstone and evidence of bears in Yosemite. This brown bear necklace was inspired by the woods and mountains in the painting. This chunky wood statement necklace has a very handsome ceramic bear focal by ceramic artist Moriah Betterly. I made the focal for the second strand of this multi strand necklace from Greek Ceramic beads and a vintage wood bead that I used in the necklace.  I pulled in the reddish brown, ochre, and green colors in the painting.  This multi strand necklace has one strand made with large Vintaj natural brass chain and the other with red Irish waxed linen thread. The brownish red and ochre beads are vintage chunky wood beads. Reddish green Greek ceramic beads were added to give the wooden necklace more color. I used a bronze leaf clasp from Znetshows to add to the woodsy theme of the necklace
    Can you find the paw print of the bear?

    I usually get pretty excited at the prospect of seeing bears even though I realize they are dangerous.  I guess I have been lucky to not have any close encounters with any.  The closest I have come to a bear was at Yellowstone and he was off in the distance with lots of people looking at him.  I learned that the easiest way to spot a bear at a National Park is to be on the lookout for park rangers.  They know the habits of the known bears and try to be in the areas to control the people!
    Trash can with warning regarding bears

      
    I have found lots of evidence that there are bears in these parks.  Most of the trash cans that are designed to keep bears out like the one above at Yosemite are often tricky for humans to open.
    Bear trap
    While hiking in Yellowstone we found an empty bear trap. 
    Road sign at Yellowstone
    I think this road sign is designed more as a warning for humans to slow down.  The roads in Yosemite are at high elevations, windy and there are few guardrails. 

    This inspiration piece and necklace brought back some great memories!



    Wednesday, March 11, 2015

    Indian Key, Florida -A Ghost Town and an Inspiration


    Looking out to the ocean from Indian Key
    I decided to visit Indian Key, Florida, because it is a ghost town with an interesting history.  Fortunately, Indian Key is preserved forever as a Florida state park in 1824, two Key West men, Joshua Appleby and a man named Snyder, sent an employee, Silas Fletcher, to open a store on Indian Key. The store was to serve wreckers, settlers and Indians in the upper Keys, and a settlement of primarily Bahamian wreckers and turtlers grew up on the island.  Wreckers were folks who salvaged goods off the many ships that ran afoul of the nearby reefs.  By 1829, the settlement was large enough to include a dozen women.  In 1836, Indian Key was the county seat for all Dade County. The county seat was moved to Miami in 1844 and the upper Keys, including Indian Key, were returned to Monroe County.   It had two-story houses, a hotel where John Audubon stayed, a post office, stores and warehouses. Indian Key thrived until August 7, 1840, when Seminole Indians attacked. About 50 to 70 residents escaped, 13 were killed, including a well-known local, Dr. Henry Perrine, a medical doctor and botanist. The Indians burned the buildings on Indian Key after thoroughly looting it.Abandoned by almost all of its civilian population, Indian Key was taken over by the Navy for the duration of the Second Seminole War which ended in 1842.

    Part of the town square
    The 1850 Census found a few families living there, while only two families were left on the island in 1860. In 1856, during the Third Seminole War, the U.S. Army stationed a few men on the island to protect the two remaining families from possible attack by Seminoles. The Keys lost most of their population again during the Civil War, but William Bethel, a wrecker, continued to live on the island from the 1850s until sometime after 1880.  The town never recovered.
    Remains of a house on the Indian Key

    All that is there now is a ghost town.  It has ruins overgrown with jungle-like vegetation, streets signs marking paths that follow the grid of original streets and crumbling foundations of buildings.  This island doesn't have any fresh water so the good news is that it’s a bug-free.  It is hard to imagine that in its day, the people only had cisterns to collect water.

    Robbie's Marina 
    I went by kayak to get to the island.  I left from  Robbie’s Marina which is a favorite Florida stop.  The kayak trip to Indian Key is over mostly shallow water and seagrass flats. Since the water is so shallow and clear, it is possible to see wildlife. I spotted a nurse shark and a ray. The kayak trip took 40 minutes and I enjoyed great views of the Florida Keys.  When returning to Robbie's we had a wonderful lunch there.

    Handmade Embossed Patinated Bird Pendant Available HERE

    Since returning from the trip,  I made some jewelry components to add to my shop.  One of the components is this handmade bird pendant would make a wonderful focal for a jewelry design. This bird pendant began with a 34mm natural brass circle. There is one hole at the top. If you would like additional holes just convo me. I embossed it with this bird and tree pattern and patinated the metal. The patina metal pendant has been buffed to reveal some of the raw brass of the design. I used patinas of moss and emerald green and yellow. Both sides has been sealed to protect the finish. The reverse side of this bird focal has the same colors and the raised parts buffed to reveal the raw brass.  This bird pendant was inspired by the story of John Audubon staying at a hotel on the Island and working on some of his bird drawings while there.  


    Saturday, March 7, 2015

    Water Creatures Inspire Me


    Manatee Coming Up for Air
    If you look at my jewelry and my handmade cards in my online shop, you will see lots of items that have some kind of connection to water creatures.  There is a reason why!  I am drawn to them.  I live by the water because I love all things water.  I want to share some of my inspirations from nature.  

    I had my first sighting of a manatee right off a boat dock.  I saw manatees here last year, but this year I heard the manatee come up for air.  He made loud snorts that reminded me of the sounds whales make when they come up for air.  It was a big sound because this is a big  mammals.
    Stingray
    I spotted this stingray swimming across the water close to shore by our condo in Key Largo.  
    Baby Croc
    This cute baby croc was spotted in a trip to the Everglades.  When it is too cold to swim in the Keys which is rare, we head to the Everglades for a fun time.  I know that is strange, but it is fun to see crocs and lots of alligators and get some exercise walking at the same time.  We observe them from a respectful distance and a long lens.
    Florida Bay
    Have you noticed that I use a lot of aqua and turquoise in my creations.  In the Keys, I am surrounded by those colors.  No matter how many times I see the turquoise water, I am always amazed and in awe.
    Starfish Necklace by Bay Moon Design
    This starfish necklace  has an artisan starfish pendant. I attached it to some sea glass beads with white Irish Waxed linen thread to give it an ocean look. This starfish necklace has aqua sea glass beads contrasted with teardrop beads that are a dark pinkish red. This nautical necklace had 2 handmade artisan brown seashells. The copper clasp is handmade by me. You can see how this necklace is created to remind you of the ocean and its underwater creatures.
    Sea Shell Earrings by Bay Moon Design
    These artisan sterling silver earrings are made with mint Czech glass beads that remind me of seashells. I combined them with what looks like sea glass. I also added a swarovski crystal to each. These beads are meticulously wire wrapped with sterling silver wire. The ear wires on these seashell earrings are handmade by me.  You can see where the inspiration for these earrings comes!
    Starfish Earrings by Bay Moon Design

    Sun and summer!  If you love these words, you will love these handmade starfish earrings.  They are great summer, casual and fun earrings.  I combined white starfish with aqua beads that remind me of the turquoise water of the Keys.  These aqua beads are recycled glass that reminds me of sea glass.  The gold brass findings are an addition to make these beach earrings shimmer like the sand in the sun.
    Whales in the Dominican Republic
    One of my fondest memories is seeing and hearing whales in the Dominican Republic.  Whales are a favorite inspiration that I use.
    Thank You Card by Bay Moon Design
    The saying "Thanks a Ton" is on the front of this Thank You card along with a gray whale. White clouds are embossed on the front in the white paper. There are blue waves and clouds on the front.
    I have to say I am very thankful that I have been given all of these sights for inspiration. Where do you find your inspiration?

    Monday, March 2, 2015

    Bead Peeps Swap N Hop Heads from USA to Germany



    I am mailing a paddled envelope tomorrow to my Bead Peeps Swap N Hop partnerClaire Fabian of Saraccino byCF



    My package will have lots of goodies inside.  Most are wrapped in tissue paper to help keep the package light since it is traveling from Key Largo, Florida to Leipzig, Germany where Claire lives.  I have included a list of what everything is and who the bead artists are.  The only item that is easily identified is the bright red Sari ribbon I tied onto a tiny box.  When I get my package from Claire, I will post what I got.

    Don't forget to mark your calendars for May 2 for the big reveal.

    Sunday, March 1, 2015

    17th BNB Challenge: The Art Form of Kolam March 1




    What is a kolam?
    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.oZx0TJVt.dpuf
    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.sgOj8hfo.dpuf
    Divya Narasimhan is the sponsor of the 17th BNB Challenge:  The Art of Kolam.  When I first saw this inspiration piece, I thought how on earth can I use these colors and design as an inspiration to create something of my own.  I didn't know what a Kolam was and the color combinations were not anything that I use.  After doing some reading, I started noticing Kolams and once I used the colors in on my jewelry piece I found joy and happiness in them.

    A Kolam is a geometrical line drawing composed of curved loops, drawn around a grid pattern of dots. In South India, it is widely practiced by female Hindu family members in front of their houses. There are different types of Kolams.  When I read that they are similar to Celtic knots that was when I got the idea that I could do this. I could relate to Celtic knots and now to Kolams.
    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet. - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf
    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet. - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf
    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet. - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf
    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet.
    - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf

    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf
    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf

     

    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet. - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf

    Bay Moon Design's  Kolam "Happiness"

    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet. - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.fXTuXU3P.dpuf

    What is a kolam?
    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.a1Ry9bD2.dpuf
    Types of Kolam 
    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet.

    Inspiration
    For this challenge I have made an inspiration collage of different south Indian (particularly Tamil) kolams so that I can provide a variety of forms, textures and colors for you. Shown in the Inspiration Picture are sikku kolam (lamps), geometric pulli kolam, freehand peacocks and the border which is a combination of nelli (squiggly lines) on red ochre paste. The image background refers to Sand - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.sgOj8hfo.dpuf
    What is a kolam?
    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.a1Ry9bD2.dpuf
    What is a kolam?
    Kolams (Pronounce Koh' Lum) are designs drawn in front of houses or inside infront of Altars to Invite people and positive energy (Gods, Goddesses) in. In olden days they made out of rice powder to feed insects and rodents as a way to in promote co-existence and harmony.
    Kolam designs are based on the simple yet fundamental Elements of design. Dots are first arranged in a grid like pattern, and are connected with lines to form shapes.  Colors and textures are used to bring about a 3D look and feel. The outlines are always white; sometimes they are left plain or adorned with Kavi (red ochre paint) or filled with colors -Tertradic color schemes (4 four bright colors) are followed; Black color is generally not used - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.a1Ry9bD2.dpuf
    Types of Kolam 
    Pulli Kolam (designs based on dots, Kambi kolam (designs based on lines), Maa kolam (curve lines drawn with rice flour paste), Sikku kolam (knots created on a dotted grid but without joining the dots - very similar to celtic knots), Kavi/semman kolam (drawn in red ochre color), and fancy kolams drawn with flowers, food grains, rock salt etc. The people in the southern Indian make it differently than their northern counterparts, where its is always drawn with color and is called Rangoli and it looks like a carpet.

    Inspiration
    For this challenge I have made an inspiration collage of different south Indian (particularly Tamil) kolams so that I can provide a variety of forms, textures and colors for you. Shown in the Inspiration Picture are sikku kolam (lamps), geometric pulli kolam, freehand peacocks and the border which is a combination of nelli (squiggly lines) on red ochre paste. The image background refers to Sand - See more at: http://www.jewelsofsayuri.com/2015/01/bnb-international-challenge-17-kolam.html#sthash.a1Ry9bD2.dpuf
    I created an embossed and patinated Celtic knot component to meet this challenge. My handmade artisan Indian inspired Kolam pendant can be used to brighten a jewelry design. This embossed and patinated pendant began with a 34mm natural brass circle. There is one hole at the top. If you would like additional holes just convo me. I embossed it with a Celtic pattern and patinated the metal. The patina metal has been buffed to reveal some of the raw brass of the design. I used patinas of hot pink blue combination and yellow and green combination. Both sides has been sealed to protect the finish. The reverse side of this unique focal has the same colors and the raised parts buffed to reveal the raw brass. 

    Take a look at what everyone created for this challenge.  Some folks made pieces of jewelry and others made beads like I did.  My handmade component is called "Happiness".  Voting takes place here https://www.facebook.com/BeadPeepsBNBpublicVote .
     Stop by and vote for your favorite in each category.  You can place your vote from March 1 to March 7.  Thanks Divya for the challenge!